Crab Leg Stew 게장찌게

June 21, 2014 § Leave a comment

Oh my, oh my, oh my….THIS WAS AAA-MMAA-Z-I-N-G!!!!  Not surprisingly, my partner made it—he’s such a great home cook!  It is times like these that I’m so happy that he’s my roomie!  I wish you could climb into the photos and smell it and eat it—it was THAT delicious!  It was the perfect stew to match the cooling weather here.  The first day of summer has ended a little chilly, so the comforting stew tasted that much better.

INGREDIENTS (in order of when you’ll need them):

  • anchovies for stock
  • Korean fermented bean paste
  • Korean hot pepper paste
  • crab legs
  • garlic
  • onions
  • Thai chili peppers
  • scallops
  • green onions (we didn’t have them on hand, so this was omitted)

 

PREPARATION:

  1. First, prepare fish stock to use as a base for the stew.  Fill a pot with filtered water and let it boil.  Add anchovies and let it boil for at least 15 minutes. Then take out and toss the anchovies.
  2. In this step, a 5:1 ratio of bean paste to pepper paste is used. To the boiling stock, first add some bean paste and mix it well.  Allow it to come back up to a boil and then add the pepper paste.  Allow it to come back up to a boil again.
  3. Add the sliced garlic and crab legs.  Boil.
  4. Finally, add sliced onions and Thai chilies.  Boil.
  5. Boil for at least 30 minutes more so all the flavors combine.  At this point, the stew is done and can be served later.
  6. Before serving, add scallops (and green onions if you have them) to the boiling stew and cook just until the scallops are done.
  7. Serve and ENJOY!!!

 

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Tender Squash, Juicy and Sweet Cucumbers

August 21, 2013 § 1 Comment

Zucchini from my mom’s garden is one of the things I miss the most.  She grows the Korean variety (surprise, surprise).  So you can probably imagine my excitement when someone gave me some squash from their garden!  Oh—yes, they were just as tender cutting through them as I remembered!  There is NOTHING that comes close to homegrown veggies.

I *mandolined* the cucumbers to make the “salted cucumbers” that we always order extra on our bagels at Beauty’s Bagel in Oakland, mentioned here.  Since we don’t eat a lot of sandwiches at home, I eventually morphed it into a Korean side dish (post will come later).

I made this pasta dish the day I received these beauties….look how tender and juicy they look!

Ingredients:  avocado oil, green & yellow squash, pan-roasted garlic, clams & their juice, saffron, crushed red pepper, white wine, sea salt, butter, Parmigiano-Reggiano

THE B.E.S.T. SASHIMI E.V.E.R!!!

August 16, 2012 § Leave a comment

This is the best sashimi I ever had (my earlier experiences while in college with sashimi don’t count since I was a newbie then) was on an island near Busan, Korea (거제도).  This place is only known by word-of-mouth and the menu is dependent on whatever fish is caught that morning (I think the ones we ate were all line-caught).  They also serve other fresh seafood; and by fresh, I mean that some are still MOVING on the plate!

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Korean Black Mackerel Stew

August 12, 2011 § 3 Comments

I have a love-hate relationship with meat and seafood…..if it looks or feels kind of gross, then I really don’t want to touch it or have anything to do with it.  So the spouse and I have an agreement that I would never touch or cook whole fish myself and it would be up to him to make the meal.  I have a lot of issues with eating and cooking things that are looking back at me….it just seems so….wrong….!!!

Growing up, mackerel was NEVER a favorite, let alone letting the potent smell permeate throughout the entire house while my mom had it boiling away in a spicy stew!  So I vowed that I would NEVER, EVER cook or even allow this smelly fish into my house….

HOWEVER,  I do have to acknowledge the many benefits of mackerel.  It is PACKED with nutrition, is a lower-in-the-food-chain fish, AND is a sustainable fish!  This is a “feel good” kinda fish.

So as usual, I ate my own words—-I actually made this spicy stew myself and it was surprisingly really delicious.  I still didn’t eat the fish, but I had a little taste of the broth and vegetables.  The spouse was extremely pleased and asked for another bowl of rice!  I think this will have to be entered in my repertoire as a “classic”.

I didn’t document the steps it took to make this stew, but you’ll notice a big, round, white radish in the background.  That’s the Korean version of the white radish we use, but one can substitute it with the Japanese daikon radish.  The Korean white radish has great flavor—it is a little spicier than the daikon radish, but it is more refreshing.  So when cooking a stew that seems a bit “heavy” (like the oily mackerel), then the spicier Korean white radish balances it well with a refreshing finish.  A side of bitingly fresh kimchi is also a MUST!

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